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, sh.shahrbanian@modares.ac.ir
Abstract:   (708 Views)
Disruption of the homeostasis of immune regulatory mediators Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and Ornithine decarboxylase-1(ODC-1) is involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Physical activities play a role in controlling and improving the symptoms of MS. This study was conducted in order to investigate the effect of 4 weeks of physical activity in an enriched environment on the gene expression of AhR and ODC-1 in the cerebellum tissue of an MS mice model. This experimental study was conducted on 30 female C57BL/6 mice. Mice were divided into 3 groups of 10 including 1) healthy control, 2) experimental model of MS and 3) physical activity in enriched environment. After induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the third group lived in the enriched environment for 4 weeks. Body weight and clinical score were recorded daily from induction until 28 days. The gene expression of AhR and ODC-1 in the cerebellum was measured by RT-PCR method. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using one-way analysis of variance at a significance level of less than 0.05. Activity in the enriched environment significantly decreased the gene expression of AhR compared to the EAE group (P=0/02) and also decreased the gene expression of ODC-1, but it was not statistically significant (P=0/28). Also, the clinical score improved significantly after activity in the enriched environment (P= 0/001). Lifestyle change and activity in the enriched environment led to the down regulation of the gene expression of AhR and ODC-1, and it improved the clinical score of animals.
     
Type of Study: Research | Subject: sport physiology
Received: 2023/07/10 | Accepted: 2023/09/13

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